Impact of Open Offices on Collaboration | Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences

Abstract

Organizations’ pursuit of increased workplace collaboration has led managers to transform traditional office spaces into ‘open’, transparency-enhancing architectures with fewer walls, doors and other spatial boundaries, yet there is scant direct empirical research on how human interaction patterns change as a result of these architectural changes. In two intervention-based field studies of corporate headquarters transitioning to more open office spaces, we empirically examined—using digital data from advanced wearable devices and from electronic communication servers—the effect of open office architectures on employees’ face-to-face, email and instant messaging (IM) interaction patterns. Contrary to common belief, the volume of face-to-face interaction decreased significantly (approx. 70%) in both cases, with an associated increase in electronic interaction. In short, rather than prompting increasingly vibrant face-to-face collaboration, open architecture appeared to trigger a natural human response to socially withdraw from officemates and interact instead over email and IM. This is the first study to empirically measure both face-to-face and electronic interaction before and after the adoption of open office architecture. The results inform our understanding of the impact on human behaviour of workspaces that trend towards fewer spatial boundaries.

This article is part of the theme issue ‘Interdisciplinary approaches for uncovering the impacts of architecture on collective behaviour’.

I have an intense dislike of open-plan offices, and this research result surprises me not at all. If you’re trying to focus, noise and motion are terrible.

But they’re great for micromanagement and management by walking around. And they save money. And nothing reinforces the hierarchy like seeing who retains an office and who gets chucked out into the pit.

Update 8/8/18: Here’s a nice PBS NewsHour video covering the findings.

via Impact of Open Offices on Collaboration | Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences

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Computer engineer from San Diego. Obsessed with hardware, software, timekeeping and elegance.

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