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Photography Watches

Tiny machines

Springs and gears and levers, painstakingly made and finished.

Playing with the Moment macro lens during a long Zoom call.

It’s hard to make these and the fine details add cost. But dang they’re beautiful.

Categories
Watches

Christopher Ward C60 Elite 1000

Image from CW

I used to covet the Omega Planet Ocean, in the orange-accent model:

https://www.omegawatches.com/en-us/watches/seamaster/planet-ocean-600m/the-collection/product

The Omega, ref 215.32.44.21.01.001, is $6,450 USD. It’s lovely. This Christophe Ward, ref C60-42ADD3-T0BB0-B0, is $1,680. It has a lot to recommend it, but lets start with pictures. All of these are from their press release.

Looks good on a bracelet, doesn’t it?

That blue/orange.

ETA 2836, with chronometer certification

Up close, the applied markers and three-dimensional hands look beautiful. This thing looks, in a word, luxurious.

Lume shot

I’ve owned CW’s (three maybe?) so as expected the lume is first rate.

Yep. I want one.

So, now that we’ve blitzed the pictures, some information for the rational part of your brain:

  • 42mm diameter, 15.4mm thick, 49.3mm lug to lug. 22mm lugs.
  • 77g in weight for just the watch, 133g on full 21cm bracelet
  • Grade 2 titanium case and bracelet
  • Water resistant to 1000m (exceptional for a watch with a display casebook)
  • Zirconia ceramic bezel
  • SuperLumiNova X1 GL C1
  • Anti-reflective-coated sapphire crystal
  • Sandblasted and polished hands

The movement is the Sellita SW220, a close copy of the ETA 2836 day-date:

  • Swiss made
  • 38 hour power reserve
  • COSC chronometer certified, -4/+6 seconds per day.
  • Hacking and handwinding
  • Automatic

There are versions in black too if the orange is too bold for ya:

CW has done several iterations of their logo and its placement, which is of no interest to me. The hands are their most recent and I’m more fond of the minute than the hour. Legible day and night.

At 42mm by 49mm, its Pelagos sized and a lot less expensive. The bracelet even has an on-wrist length adjustment, like the Pelagos.

I’m liking it. I’m talking to Christopher Ward to see if I can review and maybe buy one.

https://www.christopherward.com/c60-elite-1000-blue-orange-1

Categories
Watches

Good looking field watch

Way back in 2012 (or was it 2011?) I exchanged a few emails with Leo Padron about starting his own watch company. At the time, he was restoring vintage watches and had the urge to start his own brand. He’d found my “Design and make your own watch” page and I wrote a blog post about him as well (lost due to Confluence’s shitty export code).

This month, he emailed me with an interesting update. He’s at Drop now and designed a field watch, the Felix.

The Felix is here on Drop; the image gallery above is from their site. Specs, also from their site:

  • Case Size: 39.5mm x 11mm (42mm lug to lug)
  • Water Resist: 100 Meters (10 ATM)
  • Case Material: 316L Stainless Steel with bead blasted finish
  • Crown: Screw-down crown located at 16H.
  • Crystal: Double Dome Sapphire Crystal with Antireflective coating Movement: Sellita SW-200 Automatic Movement 26 Jewels 28,800 BPH 39 Hour Power Reserve Hack lever Made in Switzerland
  • Band: 20mm brown leather band (with add-on canvas band)
  • Warranty: 2 Year International Warranty
  • MSRP: $349 ($299 preorder)

That’s a decent MSRP, and very good to excellent IMHO at the $300 preorder price. I quite like the rounded shape for comfort, and at 39mm this should wear like a dream. It’s got enough design in it to not be boring or me-too as well. Good lume, well sized hands, and a delightful ring of color on the offset crown too.

On the minus side, I’ve never been a fan of the 13 to 24 numbering on a dial, though that’s a pretty small complaint.

Nice work Leo!

drop.com

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Uncategorized Watches

You are not imagining things

Categories
Site news

WatchOtaku.com mirrored and shut down

For several years, I created and maintained a Wiki-based site called WatchOtaku.com. It was a fun exercise, and I still like how well wikis work for this sort of heavily-lined content, but as of Sep 2019 I’ve taken it down. I exported the entire site as HTML and am hosting it for your reference on my server. Most of the content is less relevant, e.g. current vendor lists, but perhaps after being indexed it might sometimes be useful.

If I am ever bed-ridden but able to type, I’ll tackle the task of collating watch lists and reviews. There are a lot of them and my hobby time is limited; for now I’ll content myself with the archive.

Please note that, in a shitty display of lost data and missing features, Confluence cannot export blog posts so all of my hard work there is just lost. Yeah, I’m angry too. Another reason to stop paying Atlassian.

Update: Well goddamn it. I can’t see blog entries older than 2011, even though they’re available via URL. Hey Atlassian, this sucks.

Categories
recommendations reviews Watches

You should buy an OWC dive watch

Normally when you write a review you attempt to be impartial, to set aside any bias or prejudgement you might have and be as fair as you can to the watchmaker and your readers. This is a massively biased review. Let me explain.

I first corresponded with Dan Fock back in 2009 when I was writing for ABlogToWatch, when I got the MS-5517 to review. Ten years ago! That initial email and review blossomed into a friendship that I count among my closest, despite the fact we’ve never met, and over that time I’ve reviewed and owned two or three 5517s, both on ABtW and my previous site, WatchOtaku. I’ve also recommended OWC to other sites and friends, both as a fine watch and as a company deserving of publicity. Heck, I even remade his website for a while! I’m an advocate, not an impartial judge. Thinking about those things led me to reuse the idea and title behind my Scurfa review – “You should buy a Scurfa dive watch.” Because I think that you should buy an OWC.

On a closely related note, impartial reviews can and should stick to the original straps and bracelets. I, however, while strongly a bracelet guy, do not like the OWC bracelet as too heavy, so this review will feature straps that I prefer, with of course details and links.

Let’s get started.

Three generations of OWC

You’re looking at three generations of OWC, so let’s start there. I would characterize Dan’s watch philosophy as “kaizen,” the Japanese term for continuous improvement. Often seen in manufacturing and research, kaizen here means that every generation of OWC is subtly different and better than the last. That can be difficult as a prospective customer, as there’s always the dilemma of “buy now and enjoy” versus “wait for the next, improved model” as famously sunk the Osborne computer company. Here, we have my MS-6538 “Big crown” leftmost, a previous-generation MS-9411 “Snowfake” center and MS-9411-GD “Gradient Dial” on the right. Straps are the Moose Strap “Premium Slim Nato”, the Toxic Magnum and the Scurfa blue, respectively. More later on the straps.

Let’s start with the differences and commonalities. The center 9411 has a Rolex-style bezel edge, while the others have knurled (crosscut) edges. Ditto with crowns, coin edge vs knurled. I find knurling to be easier to grip, espectially when wet, muddy or begrimed, though honestly either style works well. All three watches have mechanical movements, lume-inlaid ceramic bezels, 316L stainless steel cases, 20mm lugs with Torx-bolt bars, screw-down crowns, sapphire crystals with dual-side antireflective coatings and solid steel casebacks.

The 6538 has Mercedes-style hour hand and a red second hand, Sub-style circle and rectangle hour markers, black rehaut and large crown with no crown guards. The 9411 has Snowflake hands, square/rectangle markers, minute marks on the dial, a brushed steel rehaut and deeper red second hand and a bezel that adds minute markers from zero to 15 plus a date window at 4:30. The gradient dial 9411 moves the minute markers onto a black rehaut, goes to matching orange OWC logo/second hand and reverts to 5 minute spacing on the bezel. And of course the spectacular central color gradient dial, shading from medium to deep blue, paired with the addition of applied markers; the GD is by far the most luxury-watch of the three.

three owc watches

The cases are pretty similar. Note, and this is important, the Torx-key bars – while incredibly strong and reliable, the larger holes don’t work with straps that have quick-release springbars, so no Barton canvas or silicone on these.

The 6538, photographed to show the applied markers and anti-reflective coatings.

The 9411, showing similar hand finishing, printed markers and crown.

At this angle, the gradient isn’t visible but can see that its gloss finished versus matte, as well as the very well finished applied markers and hands. This dial is just plain sexy.

See what I mean?

At most angles the gradient stuns.

As I like in a luxury watch, the reflective surfaces provide a varying and beautiful play of light.

The cases are so well made that they are optically flat – I initially tried to lightbox these but decided to show how good the polishing is.

So you can selfie on the side of your watch. Also note that the tiny screws in the bezels, it’s user-serviceable in case you get sand or grit in the mechanism.

Casebacks use the same Torx bit. These watches are super tough and Dan personally pressure tests each one. Dan, in fact, spent a lot of money on a pressure testing machine to do so.

Each OWC comes in a Pelican-style, OWC-branded waterproof box that I reuse when on the beach. Outside of the Pelican case, is the custom designed and made outer case, cut from bombproof 1cm thick high density polyethlene that is initially a puzzle to open. Here you can also see why I chose the blue Scurfa strap – it matches the dial almost perfectly and is the most comfortable dive strap I own.

Here you can see what’s in the box: two OWC-branded Torx drivers, the butterfly-deployant bracelet, spare bars and the amazing OWC kangaroo strap. It’s summer here, and sweat ruins leather, otherwise I’d simply wear them on the kangaroo all the time as its a wonderful, comfortable strap that looks fantastic.

Showing the strap lining, solid end links and deployant clasp. Also note the foam cubes in the Pelican case; this lets you customize the storage space in case you want to reuse it for a camera, phone, etc.

Dan also made some commercial silver coins with custom logo. If you buy a snowflake you’ll get one. Beautiful, mirror-polished silver in a clear plastic case, it’s mesmerizing to play with.

Here’s pics from Dan showing the OWC coin. He only had two of these made so far but more may be forthcoming next year.

I paired this 9411 with the bulkier Toxic Magnum strap. It’s similar in comfort to the Scurfa but styled like an Isofrane, with both straps being strong, flexible and having lots of closely-spaced sizing holes. You can get both from Toxic Natos.

Sorry about the residual fingerprint.

This feels to me more like a rugged, get shit done and don’t mess around watch. I appreciate having the date function, too.

I like the minute markers better on the rehaut, but here it does make precise time easier to discern and it’s a legible, well-balanced dial.

That’s what you see when you open the box, before I removed the bracelets.

So which watch would I recommend? I’m torn, and here’s why – the 9411 has the date that I like for an everyday watch and a no-nonsense, functional look. The gradient dial, however, is great for when I want something beautiful and and superbly detailed, and it’s a great example of why blue dials are popular. I love what color and gradient bring to the functional OWC look and the negative space on the dial is reminiscent of the nine! thousand! dollar! Blancpain Bathyscaphe that I covet in vain. Also, I already have my 6538, and the 9411 might be a bit too similar in terms of style.

Interestingly, the snowflake hands are quite a bit more legible than the mercedes hands on the 6538; day or night the 9411s are faster and easier to read.

So I’ve already told Dan that I want to buy a gradient dial for myself. And I may end up with the 9411 as well. At $1,200 to $1,500 each, these are simultaneously less expensive than most Swiss-made and more expensive than many microbrands. I’ve used macro lens pictures to try and capture the fineness of finishing so that you can understand why I think they represent value for money. Subjectively, they feel like luxury dive watches, especially the gradient dial, yet I don’t hesitate to wear them into the ocean or hiking. They occupy a fiercely contested price range, of course, and there are scads of competitors to consider as well. I’d point to Monta, Farer, RGM, and maybe Benarus/Raven, Weiss, NTH and Nodus.

One important note: one psychological component of luxury is recognition, in which other people can tell what you’re wearing and infer cost and social status from it. OWC is almost opposite to that, in that they sell in small numbers, advertise very little and generally don’t carry the prices or margins required, so if you want to emphasize your success, look to brands that advertise more. This carries credibility on another axis, that of skill and knowledge, so among watch geeks you will have status, but frankly that’s not a very good reason since most people just don’t care.

These are superbly made watches that you can rely upon.

In the all-important functionality, there are two key aspects not photographed here: timekeeping and luminosity. All of these, and indeed every OWC watch, are hand-tuned and adjusted by Dan’s watchmaker before they are shipped, and indeed each of these keeps COSC or better time. The movements are either ST1812 or Soprod A10, but honestly they’re similar in handwinding, feel and accuracy, with the same 28,800vph beat rate and ease of service. All are better in thinness than the 2824, and are all easy to service by any watchmaker.

Normally I have lume photographs, but the camera I use with my lume rig has been donated to a cousin and my Lumix macro lens can’t focus properly. So please accept my apologies and also that these are all spectacularly lumed, visible all night and equal to almost any dive watch made.

I will be shipping the 9411s to the time bum for review, but as I said above I hope to buy one or both for my collection. And given my quartz bias, this is my highest praise and recommendation. These are superb watches and like it says on the tin, I think you should buy an OWC dive watch. Tell Dan I said hi.

http://www.orangewatchcompany.com/

Categories
Watches

Yay weekends

That is all.

Categories
Watches

It’s okay to shower with your dive watch. | planetkris

Great post, via Hackaday. He puts sensors into a watch and torture tests for temperature, pressure and water resistance.

Quite possibly Invicta’s finest hour.

Enjoy!

Categories
Random Watches

Truth, beauty and quartz

A recent podcast (Scottish Watches, with Adam Craniotes) there was a nice side discussion of the nature of men’s watches. “Metal Barbie dolls,” to paraphrase, and it did inspire a thought or two.

This is the watch on my wrist now – Seiko SBGX117, a Grand Seiko quartz diver made between 2014 and 2017. 42mm, steel, titanium hands, thermocompensated quartz movement accurate to ten seconds per year. List price was about 4k USD new, I got it used in a trade for about about 2500.

Seiko SBGX117
Seiko SBGX117

If you’re curious, Ariel wrote a nice review here on ABtW.

I’ve also been enjoying this Scurfa recently too:

Scurfa Diver One DI-500

And of course my even-more-accurate 9F GMT:

Seiko SBGN001

For men in the western culture milieu, the only socially acceptable forms of jewelry are the watch and wedding band. There are few exceptions, of course; I’m speaking in generalities here for cishet.

And we’re not allowed to ever, ever call them ‘pretty.’ It has to be masculine, engineering-focused, etc. All gendered language. Yet all the while, we’re always looking for beauty, even if we call it proportion, ratio, finishing and craftwork.

We are, however, allowed to Seek Truth, and for that quartz is king. There’s a wonderful well of difficult problems, interesting physics and obsessive engineering required to make a really accurate timekeeper, and these Seiko 9F movements are among the finest ever made. For that matter, I have a lot of meetings these days, often over video with remote participants, so it is super useful to know the precise time.

9F movement, picture Seiko

So watches are how we thread the needle of societal expectations. We can enjoy manly bonding over our shiny jewelry while still performing masculinity. And hey, it really does come in handy to know what time it is with a watch that can get wet, handle rough treatment, lasts a decade or more and doesn’t require charging every day or two and setting every week.

Categories
Watches

OWC reviews in progress…

Snowflake + Toxic

Just wanted to post a brief update – I’m done photographing the watches and will be doing photo edits and starting the writing. It took much longer than planned:

  • My copy of Apple Aperture now crashes doing almost anything, so I had to find a new photography app and get it setup. That’ll be a separate post but the app is Luminar.
  • My nifty setup for lume photos doesn’t work with the lenses I have on the GF1. 😦 So my lume pictures are awful for now.
  • Work got busier than normal.

Anyway… it’s in progress!